Snakes Snakes Snakes, Oh My!

http://www.floridawildlifemagazine.com/report-sightings-of-rare-snakes.html

 

Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.
Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.
Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.
Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.
Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.
Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.
Parents or legal guardians must accompany children under 16 years of age to all hunter safety classes.

FWC asks public to report sightings of rare snakes

FWC biologists are asking the public to report sightings of three rare nonvenomous snake species: Florida pine snake, southern hognose snake and short-tailed snake. Citizens can help with research on these species by reporting sightings online.

“Reports from the public will aid us in determining where these snakes live and their status,” said Kevin Enge, FWC research biologist.

All of these snake species have been petitioned for federal listing.

The three species are found in dry, upland habitats and spend most of their time underground. They are only occasionally seen moving along the surface or crossing a road.

For each report, the citizen is asked to provide the location where they saw the snake and the month and year the observation occurred. Researchers are also requesting citizens to submit photos of the snakes, when possible, to verify identification.

Reports may include live or dead animals.

Although these species are nonvenomous, citizens should avoid handling or disturbing them.

For more information about living with snakes and to submit sightings to the FWC, visit MyFWC.com/Conservation.

FWC biologists also are collecting sightings of eastern diamondback rattlesnakes.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list the eastern diamondback rattlesnake as threatened and has requested the assistance of the FWC in determining the current distribution and status of this species.  You can help by reporting any observations since 2000.  If you don’t remember exactly where you saw one, but think it was on conservation land, the FWC is still interested in your observation.  You do not need to know the month or the exact year, as long as it was after 2000.

One response to “Snakes Snakes Snakes, Oh My!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s